100-million-year-old Dinosaur footprints discovered at China

There is a small restaurant in southwest China. Dinosaur footprints found in the restaurant’s courtyard last week. After those events, the place became a place of natural history. Dinoasur footprints found in the restaurant is located in Leshan, Sichuan Province.

The restaurant officially hold the footprints of two sauropods that lived in the early Cretaceous period over 100 million years ago. The property confirmed by a team from the China University of Geosciences.

Sauropods thought to evolve during the early Jurassic period, about 201 to 174 million years ago. It continued into the Cretaceous period, which lasted from 145 million to 66 million years ago.

The carnivorous Dinosaur

These carnivorous Dinosaurs had small heads, They have long necks and long tails. They are probably the largest terrestrial animal of all time.

The team that confirmed the discovery was zoologist Lida Xing’s team. Lida Xing estimated that the two sauropods—especially the brontosauruses—were probably around 8 meters (about 26.25 feet) long. The team used a 3D scanner to conduct the analyses.

On July 10, “special stains” were spotted by consumer Ou Hongtao. Hongtao said he interested in paleontology himself. He immediately contacted Xing to tell him what had happened.

The Cretaceous period was” the time when the dinosaurs really flourished,” Xing told CNN. fuds set up in Sichuan are generally from the Jurassic period, not the Cretaceous period.

The location of the restaurant is a place that served as a chicken farm. After the restaurant opened, the dirt covering the footprints was removed. It removed about a year ago. Therefore, the footprints considered to well preserve.

When we went there, our platoon set up that the dino tracks were veritably deep. That’s pretty obvious, But no one thought of [the possibility]”. Zoologist Lida Xing told CNN about the incident.

The Restaurant area should fence and guard later. A restaurant owner can build a tent for additional protection.

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